Resources


Just about every week, ASHA is alerted to new research and tools that can support the work of PreK-12 practitioners, and those involved in health education and health services programs. This page reflects a broad spectrum of content that is as diverse in its authors as it is in its subject matter. Whether you are looking for the latest guidelines from the CDC and the Department of Education, or you are looking for new and innovative projects that you can bring to your school or district, this page is designed to support ASHA’s mission to transform all schools into places where every student learns and thrives by including the latest resources in school health. 

Adolescent Health
Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs
Bullying & Suicide
Concussions
Flu
Food Allergies
Health Education
Health & Learning
Health Disparities
Healthy Schools
Human Trafficking
Media Literacy
Military Children & Schools
Natural Disasters
Nutrition
Obesity
Oral Health
Over the Counter Literacy
Physical Education
Preschool
Resources for Parents
School Health Policies & Practices
School Safety
Sexual Health
Stress
Substance Abuse
Sun Protection
Understanding Schools
Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC)
Youth Risk Behavior
Youth with Disabilities

Adolescent Health

Northwestern University’s Center on Media and Human Development released the results of a national survey titled Teens, Health & Technology.  The nationally representative survey of more than 1100 13- to 18-year-olds covers which issues teens have researched online, how satisfied they are with the information they’ve found, how they go about conducting their searches and selecting sites to click on, and whether/how they have changed their behavior as a result.

Adolescent Health: Think, Act, Grow. (TAG) is a national call to action to improve adolescent health in the United States. TAG calls upon organizations and individuals to prioritize activities that can support the health and healthy development of all of America’s 42 million adolescents. Get the TAG Playbook here. 

Back To Top

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) developed the “Talk. They hear you.” toolkit which includes resources and materials to easily promote the underage drinking prevention campaign’s message through user-friendly samples and easy-to-follow guidelines, television, radio, and print public service announcements. Parents can also access resources specifically created for them, including scripts and tips for answering difficult questions, factsheets, and other key materials.

Legacy has launched the “Finish It” campaign to empower teens to make the fight against tobacco. Read more about the campaign on their website here. Youth can visit thetruth.com to join us in finally finishing smoking for good.

Back To Top

Bullying & Suicide

CDC new resource about Bullying and Suicide

The CDC, Department of Education, and the Health Resources and Services Administration released a uniform definition of bullying in an attempt to improve consistency and comparability data on bullying.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) created KnowBullying, a mobile app that helps parents, caregivers, and educators prevent bullying by encouraging conversations with children. Developed in collaboration with the StopBullying.gov Federal partnership, KnowBullying provides strategies to prevent bullying. It includes warning signs to recognize if a child is affected by bullying, and a reminder feature to help you connect with your child when the time is right. KnowBullying also provides a special section for educators. KnowBullying is free and available on iPhone® and Android devices.

Suicide Safe, SAMHSA’s new suicide prevention app for mobile devices and optimized for tablets, helps healthcare providers and educators integrate suicide prevention strategies into their practice and address suicide risk among their patients. Suicide Safe is a free app based on SAMHSA’s Suicide Assessment Five-Step Evaluation and Triage (SAFE-T) card.

Back To Top

Concussions

The HEADS UP Concussion and Helmet Safety app (Apple) provides instant access to concussion safety info including: How to spot a possible concussion; Respond if you think an athlete has a concussion or other serious brain injury; Help an athlete return to school and play safely.  The app features a new 3D helmet fit feature that teaches about proper helmet fit, safety and care.

A new CDC report provides a snapshot on current research on concussion knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Based on the findings, the report, entitled “Concussion at Play: Opportunities to Reshape the Culture Around Concussion”, also includes potential strategies to help keep athletes safe.

Back To Top

Flu

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has a wealth of information and resources about preparing for pandemic flu.

Food Allergies

The Tool Kit for Managing Food Allergies in Schools was developed by CDC to help schools in implementing the Voluntary Guidelines for Managing Food Allergies in School and Early Care and Education Programs. The easy-to-use tool kit includes tip sheets, training presentations, and podcasts highlighting resources and action steps specific for a diverse audience of school staff.

School-wide food allergy awareness can create communities of support. With an aware and educated school community kids with food allergies can be happy and safe. These tools and resources, developed by AllergyHome.org, are designed to assist school nurses or their designees in school wide food allergy education and in the implementation of the new CDC Food Allergy Guidelines.

Back To Top

Health Education

This SHAPE America Guidance Document gives teachers, administrators, curriculum specialists and teacher trainers a detailed blueprint for designing and delivering health education that meets national, state and local standards and frameworks.

Back To Top

Health & Learning

CDC’s new resource, Health and Academic Achievement, compiles evidence showing that the health of students is linked to their academic achievement.

The National Association of Chronic Disease Directors (NACDD) has released a simplified summary of important research that was recently published on the relationship between health risk behaviors and academic achievement.

A document by The Colorado Education Initiative highlights easy to read information compiling various research findings connecting health and learning, supplemented by local school success stories.

Back To Top

Health Disparities

Child Trends Hispanic Institute’s newest report, America’s Hispanic Children: Gaining Ground, Looking Forward, funded by the Televisa Foundation, provides a comprehensive portrait of the country’s 17.5 million Hispanic children across six areas: demographics, economics, family, education, health, and media use. We note some of the significant progress Hispanics are making in education in terms of math proficiency among 8th graders, graduation rates, and college enrollment levels while also acknowledging the high level of poverty, obesity, and teen pregnancy rates among Hispanic children.

Back To Top

Healthy School Environment 

To help the cause of environmentally healthy schools, the national Coalition for Healthy Schools has a new Back to School Toolkit with fact sheets and guides on Indoor Air Quality, Healthy Purchasing, Green Cleaning and Tips for School Visits and Tours.

Healthy Cleaning Asthma-Safer Schools: A How-To Guide, which helps school districts go green and save money by transitioning to safer cleaning products and practices.

Indoor Air Quality in Schools – learn more about how IAQ issues, including mold and moisture, can affect student and staff performance.

Mold and Prevention Remediation Plan – how your school or district make a healthy indoor environment a priority.

CDC new resource about Increasing Access to Drinking Water in Schools

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) provides free meals that meet Federal nutrition guidelines to all children 18 years old and under at approved SFSP sites in areas with significant concentrations of low-income children.

Back To Top

Human Trafficking

The US Department of Education’s National Center for Safe and Supportive Learning Environments created a resource for school staff on human trafficking.

Back To Top

Media Literacy

Media-Smart Youth: Eat, Think, and Be Active! ® Media-Smart Youth is an interactive program that helps youth ages 11 to 13 better understand the media and how it can influence their health. Developed by the National Institutes of Health, the free curriculum includes 10 lessons that combine media literacy and youth development principles with federal nutrition and physical activity recommendations.

Back To Top

Military Children & Schools

University of Southern California’s Building Capacity Project – a website that addresses the unique challenges faced by students in military families, and the schools that they attend

Teachers College Press – offering free guides to support students of military families.

Back To Top

Natural Disasters

The National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) recently launched this one-stop-shop of flooding communication resources as part of its partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The resources are organized by public and professional audiences according to the three phases of a flood: before, during and after. Sections include those who are school administrators and health care professionals.

Back To Top

Nutrition

CDC Healthy Schools has a webpage dedicated to Nutrition and the Health of Young People with key facts and findings  along with resources that can be utilized by school health professionals

State and National School Snack Policies– compare your state’s snack food and beverage policies with the USDA’s standards

This infographic and tip list from the USDA highlights what K-12 schools can do to decrease their food waste.

Tip Sheets for School Districts – how to sell healthier snacks and maintain revenues (developed by CDC, Illinois Public Health Institute, National Network of Public Health Institutes and Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project)

CDC has released a report that shows U.S. children 2-18 years of age are eating more whole fruit. A related Vital Signs report found that the amount of whole fruit consumed each day increased by 67% 2003 to 2010, but is still low. Vegetable intake was also low and remained unchanged during the same time period. The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report describes trends in the contributions of fruits and vegetables to the diets of children aged 2–18 years.

A
survey of school administrators that shows that the majority of students (70%) like school meal since they became healthier (the survey was conducted in the spring of the 2012-2013 school year).

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) has released a new analysis of the sugar content of more than 1,500 breakfast cereals, including more than 180 child-directed cereals. The report also includes recommendations for policy makers, food manufacturers, and consumers. You can access the full report here.

Back To Top

Obesity

CDC Healthy Schools has a webpage dedicated to Childhood Obesity Facts including maps and tables. Resources offered within the page can be utilized by school health professionals.

The Community Preventive Services Task Force released the following findings on Obesity Prevention and Control:  Behavioral Interventions that Aim to Reduce Recreational Sedentary Screen Time Among Children. The task force recommends behavioral interventions to reduce recreational sedentary screen time among children under 13 years of age.

The NFL PLAY 60 Challenge educates and inspires kids to be physically active in school and at home for at least 60 minutes a day. All of the program materials are available to download online here.

Childhood Obesity Prevention Strategies for Rural Communities provides a range of strategies and success stories to assist practitioners in child-serving sectors, including: early care and education, schools, out-of-school time, community initiatives and healthcare.

CDC’s Division of Community Health Success Stories: Through the HealthQuest WriteSteps School Walking Initiative, thousands of Connecticut students began their day with a 10-minute walk and academic discussion.

Back To Top

Oral Health

Swish This provides lesson plans and resources for teachers to share with their students about plaque, cavities and overall oral hygiene.

Students have a microscopic view of several oral diseases in this interactive online health lesson.

Oral Health for Children and Adolescents with Special Health Care Needs: Challenges and Opportunities provides information about the population, discusses the challenges that children and adolescents with special health care needs and their families face, and presents opportunities for improving oral health and access to oral health care among these children and adolescents.

MouthHealth.org a website by American Dental Association offers tips, guides, and information on keeping mouths healthy for children and adolescents.

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Children’s Oral Health Page: About 1 of 5 (20%) children aged 5 to 11 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.1 1 of 7 (13%) adolescents aged 12 to 19 years have at least one untreated decayed tooth.1

Back To Top

Over the Counter Literacy

Scholastic’s OTC Literacy program – a critical approach to educating 5th and 6th grade students about medicine safety

Back To Top

Physical Education

Schools can transform into active environments by providing students with quality physical education and opportunities to stay active each day. Two new resources from CDC, 2012 Physical Education Profiles Report  (PE Profiles) and the  2012 Physical Education Profiles Fact Sheetexamine the policies and practices of select secondary schools and identify best practices and areas for improvement.

PE Profiles reports on categories aligned with guidelines for quality physical education and physical activity programs in the  CDC’s School Health Guidelines to Promote Healthy Eating and Physical Activity (Guidelines)

Back To Top

Preschool

Early and Often: Showing Up in Preschool Matters. Promoting regular attendance is critical to help young children reap the full benefits of a high quality program and develop a habit of on-time attendance which is so important for success in school. Early and Often offers resources for high quality early childhood programs to partner with families and ensure young children attend every day possible.

Back To Top

Resources for Parents

Net Cetera is a booklet developed by the FTC that contains updated information for parents, teachers and other adults to use when talking with kids about how to be safe, secure and responsible online.

Parent Toolkit, launched by NBC News, is a one-stop online resource for parents navigating their children’s development in the classroom and beyond.

Parents have a powerful role in supporting children’s health and learning. Parents for Healthy Schools is a set of resources, developed by CDC Healthy Schools and partners, that school groups (e.g., PTA/PTO, school wellness committee) can use to motivate and educate parents to create a healthy school environment for their children.

Back To Top

School Health Policies & Practices

The Alliance for a Healthier Generation has launched a new Model Wellness Policy to help school districts get ahead of updated requirements anticipated from USDA in 2015.

CDC’s School Health Index (SHI) assessment tool helps school-based obesity prevention and health promotion efforts.

Food Allergies & Anaphylaxis in School: What School Staff Need to Know

CDC’s 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study (SHPPS)

CDC’s School Health Profiles is a system of surveys assessing school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, territories, and tribal governments.

Bridging the Gap and CDC Local Wellness Policy Briefs:

Back To Top

School Safety

Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools Technical Assistance Center has developed a free software application designed to help schools create and update high-quality school emergency operations plans (EOPs) that are customized to address a range of threats and hazards. This application walks users through the six-step planning process. They also offer other resources and free trainings.

The National Association of School Psychologists and the National Association of School Resource Officers have created the Best Practice Considerations for Schools in Active Shooter and Other Armed Assailant Drills resource which explains the important factors schools must take into account when considering and practicing armed assailant drills.

Back To Top

Sexual Health

Advocates for Youth has released Rights, Respect, Responsibility, a K-12 sexuality education curriculum that meets the NSES, the 16 topics set by CDC, inclusive, and is free with 80+ lesson plans.

A rapidly growing number of girls in the United States, ages 0-15, are at risk of being subjected to Female Genital Mutilation or Cutting (FGM/C), the practice of partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.  The Center for Disease Control estimates that over ½ million girls in the U.S. are at risk of being cut – a number that has more tripled in 25 years.   The majority of these girls are located in areas with large populations of immigrants from countries that practice FGM/C: Los Angeles, San Francisco and San Diego; New York City area; Washington D.C. area; Seattle; Minneapolis/St. Paul; Atlanta; Dallas/Houston; Miami; Columbus, Ohio, and parts of Maine.
– DOJ Fact Sheet (English, French, Amharic, Arabic)
– U.S. Citizenship and Information Service (English) (Somali) (Swahili) (Tigrinya)
– Health and Human Services (English)

The recently revamped GetTested website offers a quiz to its testing locator to help visitors determine which sexually transmitted disease tests they need.

Understand the health and social issues facing LGBT youth and what research is still needed with these briefs from the Administration for Children and Families.

Get all your questions about the national, evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention (TPP) Program answered by OAH staff and partners in this FAQ video series. This series of 10 short TPP FAQ videos covers four topics about the current landscape of TPP, the role of evidence-based programs, accurate and effective implementation, and future directions of the TPP program.

CDC/DASH has created this PDF for state and local education agencies to help promote parental engagement in schools to help prevent HIV and other STDs among teens.

Back To Top

Stress

The Center for School, Health and Education at the American Public Health Association is focusing on chronic stress as a critical barrier to graduation. Recent discussions with high schools students in Detroit showed a high percentage of teenagers who feel depressed or sad. The issue of stress among many of the nation’s most vulnerable teens is reported in the latest Stress in America survey by the American Psychological Association.

Back To Top

Sun Protection

Developed by dermatologists, Sun Smart U is a free program based on the CDC’s National Health Education Standards.

The SunWise Skin Cancer Prevention School Program provides free curriculum, school assemblies, staff training and resources to reduce skin cancer.

Back To Top

Understanding Schools

“How Schools Work and How To Work with Schools” – published by the National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE), this primer assists anyone who would like to work more closely with various facets of the education system—with policymakers, school administrators, teachers, and other school staff—to improve the health, safety, and well-being of children and youth in schools. It aims to help people from different backgrounds, occupations, and training to better navigate the complex web of the education system.”

Speaking Education’s Language: A Guide for Public Health Professionals Working in the Education Sector discusses the experiences, successes and failures of school health experts to help public health professionals more effectively communicate and work in the education sector.

Back To Top

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child (WSCC)

Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child: A Collaborative Approach to Learning and Health

ASCD’s position on the Whole Child initiative is explained in The Learning Compact Redefined: A Call to Action.

ASCD releases WSCC Implementation Examples including national, state, and district level examples. Document will be updated quarterly to include additional examples.

CDC’s Healthy Youth website updated with WSCC components

Back To Top

Youth Risk Behavior

The Partnership for Drug Free Kids released the “Above the Influence” toolkit to help teens make healthy decisions and avoid prescription abuse.

Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance report from CDC analyzes priority health risk behaviors in youth found that in 2013 there were changes in a number of health behaviors among high school students, including those related to smoking, computer usage, and sexual activity.

Preventing Youth Violence: Opportunities for Action

Back To Top

Youth with Disabilities

Locate services for youth with disabilities through this directory of community-based services developed by the National Association of County and City Health Officials. You can also help youth with disabilities prepare for emergencies with this guide from Disability.gov.

Back To Top